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Stats in English?

Discussion in the Pro Yakyu History forum
Stats in English?
Is there any website that has NPB history stats in English, like ones MLB has on baseball-reference.com?
Comments
Re: Stats in English?
[ Author: westbaystars | Posted: Jan 2, 2004 11:09 AM | YBS Fan ]

This is it. If you have a particular player you want, I'll enter his data on request. (A few requests per day on this thread is fine.)

I'm slowly but steadilly entering historical data, but it's a loooooong term goal.
Re: Stats in English?
[ Author: Guest: Frank | Posted: Jan 2, 2004 3:38 PM ]

I bought 2 Nomo's 1993 BBM cards. On the back it has the leader of SO and Win leader from 1960-1992. I was amazed that someone won 42 games for Kintetsu back in 1961 with 353 SO, just wondering what his name is?

And being able to read a few Japanese characters myself, of being Taiwanese, I also see someone with the last of name Suzuki led the league in SO from 1967 to 1972. He also pitched for Kintetsu.
Re: Stats in English?
[ Author: westbaystars | Posted: Jan 2, 2004 8:42 PM | YBS Fan ]

- I was amazed that someone won 42 games for Kintetsu back in 1961 with 353 SO, just wondering what his name is?

I think you're referring to Nishitetsu's Inao Kazuhisa. He went 42 and 14 in 78 appearances, throwing 404 innings with a 1.69 ERA (giving up 76 earned runs). Pitchers were made of different stuff back then.

- I also see someone with the last of name Suzuki led the league in SO from 1967 to 1972. He also pitched for Kintetsu.

This is Suzuki Keishi. According to Fitts & Engel's "Japanese Baseball Superstars," Suzuki played in 703 games (11th), won 317 games (4th), lost 238 games (5th), threw 4,600 1/3rd innings (4th), allowed 4,029 hits (5th), struck out 3,061 batters (4th), walked 1,126 batters (9th), and had a career ERA of 3.11.

I can't do it today, but I'll enter career data for the pair tomorrow. If you don't see anything within 48 hours, post something to remind me.

[Fixed link on Jan 3, 2004 4:51 PM]
Re: Stats in English?
[ Author: Guest | Posted: Jan 6, 2004 11:46 AM ]

- I think you're referring to Inao Kazuhisa. He went 42 and 14 in 78 appearances, throwing 404 innings with a 1.69 ERA (giving up 76 earned runs). Pitchers were made of different stuff back then.

I don't think pitchers were as different as 1) managers, and 2) the game. Managers, especially Japanese managers, really abused pitchers, and only the most durable, like Inao, survived. For every Inao or Kaneda, there are half a dozen guys who pitched well for a season or two and then flamed out, apparently due to arm trouble.

Secondly, it is easier to pitch when only a limited number of players can hit the ball out of the park with any consistency. The more players who can do that, the more a pitcher has to make top-notch pitches every time, thus increasing the strain on the arm. If the bases are empty or even with a guy on first, you can challenge a singles hitter to get a hit, and if he does, avoid runs by making those perfect pitches to the next guys. However, when you pitch to a series of guys who can hit mistakes or the fastball down the middle of the plate out of the park, you've got to be finer with your pitches more often, and that leads to fatigue.

If you doubt the principle, watch how a smart pitcher pitches with a big lead versus in a close game. I guarantee that he'll consistently throw more fastballs with the big lead, as he's trying to save his arm for another day, and he can afford to give up a run or two. When he's got less margin for error, he'll use much more of his bag of tricks to go with the heater.

Certainly, Inao, Kaneda, and others were quite good and very durable, which makes them special. However, they aren't as superhuman as the records might make them seem in comparison to modern pitchers, IMO.

Jim Albright
Re: Stats in English?
[ Author: westbaystars | Posted: Jan 3, 2004 6:38 PM | YBS Fan ]

Data for the two are now entered. Enjoy.
Re: Stats in English?
[ Author: Guest: Arturo Lopez | Posted: Feb 19, 2005 11:05 AM ]

Suzuki (Kintetsu Buffaloes) was a very young pitcher in 1968-1973 to have been the earlier great Japanese pitcher.
Re: Stats in English?
[ Author: Guest: Kappa | Posted: Feb 20, 2005 2:16 AM ]

I understand abuse things. But in 1950 NPB expanded 8 team to 15 teams. New teams were based on amature baseball clubs. I wonder how many pichers were qualified to play at the professional level. In reality, managers had to rely on limited ace pitchers.

Inao's 42 wins:
30 games started, 257.1 innings, 23 wins, 5 losses
48 games in relief, 146.2 innings, 19 wins, 9 losses

Kaneda's 30 wins in 1963:
30 games started, 245 innings, 18 wins, 11 losses
23 games in relief, 86 innings, 12 wins, 6 losses

They were good starters and a good relievers.
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